Real English vs. Grammar-Book English (Part 2)

Sound More Natural & Understand More (Part 2)

Time table vs. Schedule/Diary

Yes, I know that “time table” seems easier to say than “schedule”, but you need to know both.  These words both refer to your private calendar with all of your meetings and obligations.  In the US, “schedule” is very common and in the UK “diary” is the norm.  Both countries agree that “schedule” as a verb means to make an appointment.

A: Hey Michael, I just had some cancelations and my schedule is totally open next Wednesday, can you have lunch? (US)

B: Let me check my diary.  Yes, I am free. (UK)

A: Perfect, let’s schedule it for about 2:00, OK? (US & UK)

(Note: The most common pronunciation of “schedule” is /ske jule/ ; however, some say /shed jule/)

Nice vs. Good looking/ Sexy/ Gorgeous…

“Nice” refers to a pleasant or polite person.  Other words refer to the way people look.

But vs. Though

OK, “but” is more common; however, “though” is used on a daily basis by native speakers.  “But” is more frequent in mid-position and “though” is more common at the beginnings and endings of sentences.

Ex: She is only 12, but has the intellectual capabilities of an adult.

Ex: Though she is only 12, she has the intellectual capabilities of an adult.

Ex: He left the party early, but he didn’t tell anyone.

Ex: He left the party early; he didn’t tell anyone, though. (spoken form)

Complete/ly vs. Thorough/ly

I believe this is another case of “fear of pronunciation”.  Since the second word, “thorough” looks strange (or weird), people avoid it.  The pronunciation is easy: /thur o/ – the “o” is the same as in “no”.

Ex: I am completely fed  up with (harto de) traffic in this city.

Ex: I am thoroughly fed up with (harto de) traffic in this city.

Ex: Their team has done a very complete job on the project.

Ex: Their team has done a very thorough job on the project.

Footing vs. Jogging

I have asked native speakers from all over the world, I have looked in many dictionaries and can find no evidence that anyone should be using this word to mean “jogging”!  I think this is Spain’s creative contribution to the language.

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