Don’t be * “iffy”

No “If” for confirmation!

Tanya: Do you want to go to lunch now?

Juan: If I want to go to lunch? Do I want to go to lunch?

When confirming information, do not start the sentence with “if”. Sentences that start with “if” are conditionals and need a result clause:

If I want to go to lunch, I have to finish all my work.

If I want to go to lunch, I will.

If I want to go to lunch, I have to remember to make a reservation.

The original sentence from above “If I want to go to lunch…” is incomplete and we will be waiting for you to finish your sentence. You may notice a confused look on our face as we wonder how you’ll finish your sentence.

*”Iffy” is a an informal word in the English language which means “uncertain” or “full of doubts”. It is, of course, derived from “if”. We often used it when people can’t make a decision. For example, If  your friend is uncertain about where to have lunch and saying:

If I go out for French food, it might be expensive. If I go out for vegetarian food, I might leave hungry.  If I go out for Mexican food, it might be too spicy for the others.

You might say, “Stop being so iffy; just decide where you want to eat”.

The antonym of “iffy” is “decisive”.

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